NJ SHARES Night With The New Jersey Devils

Save the date… The next NJ SHARES Night with the New Jersey Devils is January 20, 2017. The New Jersey Devils will once again ‘Share the Warmth’ as they take the ice on Friday, January 20th at 7:30 pm against the Montreal Canadiens, by offering DISCOUNTED stadium tickets to our supporters with proceeds benefiting NJ SHARES! Come support NJ SHARES as the Community Assist Partner of the Night.

  • Group Seating at the Game
  • Discounted Group Ticket
  • Group Welcome on the Scoreboard
  • Group Gift for Everyone in Attendance

To Order Tickets, please visit: www.newjerseydevils.com/njshares17 – Promo Code: njshares17.

If you experience technical problems with the discount code or need printable tickets, please call Joshua Malakoff at 973-757-6162. Download the PDF for ticket pricing and details. Note: The promo code is not compatible with Internet Explorer, so please use other browsers such as Chrome or Firefox.

(For purposes of identification, the notice above appeared in the NJ SHARES newsletter.)

Consumer Alert: Utilities Call Scam

The following press release was issued by the Federal Communication Commission’s Office of Media Relations:

CONSUMER ALERT: UTILITIES CALL SCAM
Beware of Callers Posing as Utility Employees Demanding Immediate Payment

WASHINGTON, November 15, 2016 – The Federal Communications Commission is alerting consumers to be on the lookout for callers pretending to be utility company employees demanding immediate payment, often by prepaid debit cards, credit cards, or gift cards. As American consumers prepare for winter months when many people would be endangered by an interruption to heating fuel, the FCC’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau wanted to make consumers aware of this scam and prepared to protect themselves.

Key Consumer Tip: If consumers receive a call warning them of a balance they do not believe they owe their utility, they should hang up, independently look up their utility company’s phone number on a recent statement or legitimate website, and call that number to verify the legitimacy of the call.

In this scam, the caller typically poses as a representative of the consumer’s actual local utility, stating that immediate payment will ensure that the consumer’s heating service will not be disconnected. The scammers are known to spoof utility company telephone numbers so the caller ID makes it appear to be a call from the utility company. These scammers often use automated interactive voice response calling systems that mimic legitimate providers’ calls. After consumers, many of whom are older adults, follow instructions via interactive prompts, they are connected to a live “customer service representative” who asks for the access code for a credit, debit, or gift card. This information allows the scammer to cash out the card or sell it to a third party.

Anyone who believes they have been targeted by this scam should immediately report the incident to their actual utility company, to local police, to the Federal Trade Commission’s Complaint Assistant and to the FCC’s Consumer Help Center.

Consumers should always be on alert for this scam and others. The following tips can help ward off unwanted calls and scams:

• Do not answer calls from unknown numbers. Let them go to voicemail.
• If you are unclear if a caller is legitimate, hang up, look up the company’s phone number independently on your recent bill or their legitimate website, and contact them through an official number, web form or email address to see if they called you. By initiating the communication yourself, you can verify that the request for payment is legitimate
• If you answer and the caller (often a recording) asks you to hit a button to stop getting the calls, just hang up. Scammers often use these tricks to identify – and then target – live respondents.
• If you receive a scam call, write down the number and file a complaint with the FCC and other appropriate authorities so we can help identify and take appropriate action to help consumers targeted by illegal callers.
• Ask your phone service provider if it offers a robocall blocking service that allows subscribers to block unwanted calls. If not, encourage your provider to start offering a blocking service. You can also visit the FCC’s website on “Web Resources for Blocking Robocalls” for information and resources on available robocall blocking tools to help you reduce unwanted calls.
• Legitimate utility companies will not demand payment via gift cards.

As the agency that implements and enforces the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, the FCC reviews all consumer complaints and will continue, when appropriate, to issue consumer alerts based on those complaints and other public information related to possible scams and frauds. This is part of a new, standing series of consumer alerts from the FCC in hopes of informing, protecting, and empowering consumers.

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Contact points for New Jersey utility companies include:
Atlantic City Electric; 800-642-3780
Elizabethtown Gas; 800-242-5830
Jersey Central Power & Light; 800-662-3115
New Jersey Natural Gas; 800-221-0051
Public Service Electric & Gas; 800-436-7734
Rockland Electric; 877-434-4100
South Jersey Gas; 888-766-9900
Sussex Rural Electric Cooperative; 973-875-5101
Vineland Municipal Electric Utility; 856-794-4021

Links to these utility companies can also be found on the New Jersey Community Resources website.

Tech Tips: Five Ways To Sidestep Cybercriminals

Password management is an area where just about everyone has room for improvement. Here’s a list of five straightforward ways to make sure your passwords and online accounts stay out of the hands of cybercriminals.

1. Find out if you’ve already been hacked
There’s always a chance that your account information is already in the hands of cybercriminals. Fortunately, there are some tools available that can help you identify and change the passwords on any accounts that have been compromised. For example, the website “Have I Been Pwned” lets you enter your email address and find out if any of your account credentials have shown up in hacker circles. You can search a list of companies that have suffered data breaches at the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. You can also consult the “List of Data Breaches” on Wikipedia, which is searchable using your web browser’s “Find” or “Search” function. Above all, be a bit suspicious and trust your instincts. If you have reason to believe a password might have been exposed, change it.

2. Use strong passwords
It’s important to use complex passwords that will be difficult for hackers to guess. Just remember that adjacent sets of adjacent letters and numbers on your keyboard – like “qwerty” or “123456” – are not complex passwords. The best passwords typically include a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters. If using complex passwords seems like too much of a pain, consider a password management tool like DashLane or LastPass. These tools help users create, store and manage complex passwords.

3. Don’t let the bad guys get your passwords
This might seem obvious, but you might be amazed at how many people keep their passwords posted in places where others can read them. You should never share your passwords and always store them in a secure location away from prying eyes. Also, don’t keep your passwords – or any sensitive information for that matter – listed in a computer file that is easily accessed without a password. Any password lists on your computer should be password protected and encrypted.

4. Use secure communications
Never send a password over email. If you want to create an account on website, make sure that the URL of that website begins with ‘https’ because the ‘s’ at the end indicates advanced security measures. Websites that begin with “http” are not as secure. Additionally, do not use public computers or public Wi-Fi to log into online banking and other sensitive accounts.

5. Choose difficult security questions
When registering an account online, you’ll often be asked to choose security questions and answers. These are used to verify your identity if you lose your password or if a security breach of some kind is suspected. The key here is to choose questions that are hard to figure out. Remember, just about anyone can find your mother’s maiden name if they really want to. Avoid using information that someone can easily look up online. For example, you wouldn’t want to rely on information that can be seen easily on a social media profile to inform your password choice – such as name of spouse, hometown, employer.

Hopefully you have found this article helpful and you’ll take a few steps to make your own password use more secure starting today.

Source: The above article is written by Carbonite , a company providing automatic cloud backup for your computer files. If you’re a Carbonite Partner or a small business, I hope you’ll share these tips your co-workers, employees and clients. And if you’re a consumer using a Carbonite Personal Plan, be sure to share these tips with friends and loved ones.

Newark, New Jersey Seeking Chief Sustainability Officer

The following post appears on a City of Newark, New Jersey government website.

Job Posting: Seeking Chief Sustainability Officer

The City of Newark is recruiting a Chief Sustainability Officer who will work closely with an interdepartmental Sustainability Team drawn from key city departments, the Newark Environmental Commission, community partners, and businesses. The team is charged with achieving a healthier, greener Newark in all five wards. The Sustainability Team will build on the framework of the Newark Sustainability Action Plan, guided by principles of environmental and social justice, to ensure all members of the community benefit from the city’s progress.

See job description here.

Applications submitted before July 25, 2016 will be given priority. Position will start in mid-September.