Anti-Democracy Representatives Motion Denied

The Supreme Court of the United States yesterday denied a motion by the state of Texas which would have overturned the election results in the states of Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan and Wisconsin. Joining in what borders on treasonous behavior were Attorneys General of seventeen – Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia – other states plus 126 members of the U.S. House of Representatives.

These House members are:

Representative Mike Johnson – Fourth Congressional District of Louisiana
Representative Gary Palmer – Sixth Congressional District of Alabama
Representative Kevin McCarthy – Twenty-Third Congressional District of California
Representative Steve Scalise – First Congressional District of Louisiana
Representative Jim Jordan – Fourth Congressional District of Ohio
Representative Ralph Abraham – Fifth Congressional District of Louisiana
Representative Robert Aderholt – Fourth Congressional District of Alabama
Representative Rick W. Allen – Twelfth Congressional District of Georgia
Representative Jodey Arrington – Nineteenth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Brian Babin – Thirty-Sixth Congressional District of Texas
Representative James R. Baird – Fourth Congressional District of Indiana
Representative Jim Banks – Third Congressional District of Indiana
Representative Jack Bergman – First Congressional District of Michigan
Representative Andy Biggs – Fifth Congressional District of Arizona
Representative Gus Bilirakis – Twelfth Congressional District of Florida
Representative Dan Bishop – Ninth Congressional District of North Carolina
Representative Mike Bost – Twelfth Congressional District of Illinois
Representative Kevin Brady – Eighth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Mo Brooks – Fifth Congressional District of Alabama
Representative Ken Buck – Fourth Congressional District of Colorado
Representative Ted Budd – Thirteenth Congressional District of North Carolina
Representative Tim Burchett – Second Congressional District of Tennessee
Representative Michael C. Burgess – Twenty-Sixth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Bradley Byrne – First Congressional District of Alabama
Representative Ken Calvert – Forty-Second Congressional District of California
Representative Earl L. “Buddy” Carter – First Congressional District of Georgia
Representative Ben Cline – Sixth Congressional District of Virginia
Representative Michael Cloud – Twenty-Seventh Congressional District of Texas
Representative Doug Collins – Ninth Congressional District of Georgia
Representative Mike Conaway – Eleventh Congressional District of Texas
Representative Rick Crawford – First Congressional District of Arkansas
Representative Dan Crenshaw – Second Congressional District of Texas
Representative Scott DesJarlais – Fourth Congressional District of Tennessee
Representative Mario Diaz-Balart – Twenty-Fifth Congressional District of Florida
Representative Jeff Duncan – Third Congressional District of South Carolina
Representative Neal P. Dunn, M.D. – Second Congressional District of Florida
Representative Tom Emmer – Sixth Congressional District of Minnesota
Representative Ron Estes – Fourth Congressional District of Kansas
Representative A. Drew Ferguson, IV – Third Congressional District of Georgia
Representative Chuck Fleischmann – Third Congressional District of Tennessee
Representative Bill Flores – Seventeenth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Jeff Fortenberry – First Congressional District of Nebraska
Representative Virginia Foxx – Fifth Congressional District of North Carolina
Representative Russ Fulcher – First Congressional District of Idaho
Representative Matt Gaetz – First Congressional District of Florida
Representative Greg Gianforte – At Large Congressional District of Montana
Representative Bob Gibbs – Seventh Congressional District of Ohio
Representative Louie Gohmert – First Congressional District of Texas
Representative Lance Gooden – Fifth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Sam Graves – Sixth Congressional District of Missouri
Representative Mark Green – Seventh Congressional District of Tennessee
Representative H. Morgan Griffith – Ninth Congressional District of Virginia
Representative Michael Guest – Third Congressional District of Mississippi
Representative Jim Hagedorn – First Congressional District of Minnesota
Representative Andy Harris, M.D. – First Congressional District of Maryland
Representative Vicky Hartzler – Fourth Congressional District of Missouri
Representative Kevin Hern – First Congressional District of Oklahoma
Representative Jody Hice – Tenth Congressional District of Georgia
Representative Clay Higgins – Third Congressional District of Louisiana
Representative Trey Hollingsworth – Ninth Congressional District of Indiana
Representative Richard Hudson – Eighth Congressional District of North Carolina
Representative Bill Huizenga – Second Congressional District of Michigan
Representative Bill Johnson – Sixth Congressional District of Ohio
Representative John Joyce – Thirteenth Congressional District of Pennsylvania
Representative Fred Keller – Twelfth Congressional District of Pennsylvania
Representative Mike Kelly – Sixteenth Congressional District of Pennsylvania
Representative Trent Kelly – First Congressional District of Mississippi
Representative Steve King – Fourth Congressional District of Iowa
Representative David Kustoff – Eighth Congressional District of Tennessee
Representative Darin LaHood – Eighteenth Congressional District of Illinois
Representative Doug LaMalfa – First Congressional District of California
Representative Doug Lamborn – Fifth Congressional District of Colorado
Representative Robert E. Latta – Fifth Congressional District of Ohio
Representative Debbie Lesko – Eighth Congressional District of Arizona
Representative Billy Long – Seventh Congressional District of Missouri
Representative Barry Loudermilk – Eleventh Congressional District of Georgia
Representative Blaine Luetkemeyer – Third Congressional District of Missouri
Representative Kenny Marchant – Twenty-Fourth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Roger Marshall, M.D. – First Congressional District of Kansas
Representative Tom McClintock – Fourth Congressional District of California
Representative Cathy McMorris Rogers – Fifth Congressional District of Washington
Representative Dan Meuser – Ninth Congressional District of Pennsylvania
Representative Carol D. Miller – Third Congressional District of West Virginia
Representative John Moolenaar – Fourth Congressional District of Michigan
Representative Alex X. Mooney – Second Congressional District of West Virginia
Representative Markwayne Mullin – Second Congressional District of Oklahoma
Representative Gregory Murphy, M.D. – Third Congressional District of North Carolina
Representative Dan Newhouse – Fourth Congressional District of Washington
Representative Ralph Norman – Fifth Congressional District of South Carolina
Representative Steven Palazzo – Fourth Congressional District of Mississippi
Representative Greg Pence – Sixth Congressional District of Indiana
Representative Scott Perry – Tenth Congressional District of Pennsylvania
Representative Bill Posey – Eighth Congressional District of Florida
Representative Guy Reschenthaler – Fourteenth Congressional District of Pennsylvania
Representative Tom Rice – Seventh Congressional District of South Carolina
Representative Mike Rogers – Third Congressional District of Alabama
Representative John Rose – Sixth Congressional District of Tennessee
Representative David Rouzer – Seventh Congressional District of North Carolina
Representative John Rutherford – Fourth Congressional District of Florida
Representative Austin Scott – Eighth Congressional District of Georgia
Representative Mike Simpson – Second Congressional District of Idaho
Representative Adrian Smith – Third Congressional District of Nebraska
Representative Jason Smith – Eighth Congressional District of Missouri
Representative Ross Spano – Fifteenth Congressional District of Florida
Representative Pete Stauber – Eighth Congressional District of Minnesota
Representative Elise Stefanik – Twenty-First Congressional District of New York
Representative W. Gregory Steube – Seventeenth Congressional District of Florida
Representative Glenn “GT” Thompson – Fifteenth Congressional District of Pennsylvania
Representative Tom Tiffany – Seventh Congressional District of Wisconsin
Representative William Timmons – Fourth Congressional District of South Carolina
Representative Jeff Van Drew – Second Congressional District of New Jersey
Representative Ann Wagner – Second Congressional District of Missouri
Representative Tim Walberg – Seventh Congressional District of Michigan
Representative Mark Walker – Sixth Congressional District of North Carolina
Representative Jackie Walorski – Second Congressional District of Indiana
Representative Michael Waltz – Sixth Congressional District of Florida
Representative Randy Weber – Fourteenth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Daniel Webster – Eleventh Congressional District of Florida
Representative Brad Wenstrup – Second Congressional District of Ohio
Representative Bruce Westerman – Fourth Congressional District of Arkansas
Representative Roger Williams – Twenty-Fifth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Joe Wilson – Second Congressional District of South Carolina
Representative Rob Wittman – First Congressional District of Virginia
Representative Ron Wright – Sixth Congressional District of Texas
Representative Ted S. Yoho – Third Congressional District of Florida
Representative Lee Zeldin – First Congressional District of New York

Listing appears in the Supreme Court file of Texas v. Pennsylvania Amicus Brief of 126 Representatives –corrected.

Words cannot express the long-lasting consequences of this attempt to circumvent the will of the American voters. Remember their names for the damage they have done to our democracy.

Ten Good Reasons To Vote Early In Philly

The following article is written by Jane Century, an active participant of the Philly Voter Engagement Network. She wrote this for her neighborhood listserv. It is reprinted with permission. So, if you have a mail-in ballot, complete it, then bring it to a nearby Satellite Election Office or drop box locations around Philadelphia. Other voter information is available on the City Commissioners website.

In the past month, I debated whether to surrender my mail-in ballot and vote in person.  But info I gleaned from elected officials and other reliable sources helped me confirm my decision to drop off my mail-in ballot at a satellite voting center last week.  I realize this is a personal decision for each of us.  If you are still undecided, consider the following:

1.            Mail-in votes will begin to be processed sooner than machine voting.  Philly has acquired state-of-the-art ballot scanners that can scan 16,000 ballots an hour.  The City will begin opening and scanning ballots as soon as the polls open at 7am on Nov 3 and run continuously – 24/7 thereafter.   This means that by the time machine ballot counts begin to be released to the media at 9 – 10 pm or later on Election Night, as many as 240,000 paper ballots may already be tabulated in Philadelphia alone.  If the vast majority favor one candidate, it can be projected that the remainder will follow suit.  This data will be reported as it becomes available. The President will find ways to cast doubt on everything, no matter what.

2.            COVID safety at the polls.  Polling places are indoor spaces. Voters will be standing six feet apart indoors and out and my face long waits.  Voters will be asked to arrive with a mask and will be provided hand sanitizer and a single glove for handling the pen for their signature and touching the touch screen, which can only be cleaned with a microfiber cloth.  Voters are not legally required to cooperate with either the mask or glove policy. 

3.            Voting machine equipment is complex.  Our new touchscreen voting machines are still relatively new.  They have complex mechanical and digital functions that also generate paper ballots after each vote is cast.  Any equipment failures can slow down the process. 

4.            Voting in person takes time.  Unlike voting from home on a paper ballot at your kitchen table, many voters are still unfamiliar with touch screen voting and how to proofread the paper ballot that gets printed after each vote.  This year, there are also four ballot initiatives. Many people arrive at the polls without having reviewed these ahead of time. If people accidentally “spoil” their ballot while voting on the machine and need to redo it, decide to surrender their paper ballot and vote in person or need to complete a provisional ballot for any reason, this will slow the process for everyone.

5.            Lots of new poll workers are being hired. This may lengthen the process.  Many older, experienced poll workers have stepped away from serving this year due to concerns about COVID.  The City received applications from 20,000 people willing to serve as poll workers to fill 8,000+ positions.  The Board of Elections is currently working its way through a long list of returning and new volunteers and trying to fill vacant positions as quickly as possible. While all who serve must attend or watch a training, many polling places will be staffed by people with no prior experience.  They must come prepared to oversee safety protocols for COVID, answer a myriad of questions and possibly resolve disputes arising from poll watchers. 

6.            Mail-in ballots are the perfect antidote to threats of voter intimidation.  In the face of calls by the White House for an “army of volunteers” to watch over polling places, Mayor Kenney has been clear that voter intimidation tactics will not be tolerated.  But if everyone has already cast their ballots safely ahead of time, and there are no voters waiting in line to intimidate, well, you get the point.

7.            Early voting is totally in your control.  Once you complete your ballot, you can drop it off any one of 17 satellite centers, knowing it will be stored safely and securely, under guard.

8.            The sooner people complete and turn in a mail-in ballot, the easier it will be to prep them for efficient scanning.  And the less congestion there will be at the polls.  Don’t put it off to the last minute.

9.            There are now 17 satellite voting centers.  If you already have your ballot, you can fill it out at home and drop it off in a minute. If not, you can request one and complete it there. (If your ballot has not arrived, but your application has been confirmed online, you can cancel it in person at any satellite center, any time up to 8pm Nov 3, and obtain a new one to submit right there.  See: https://www.phila.gov/2020-09-29-visit-a-satellite-election-office-today/

10.        Peace of mind.  Once you know your ballot has been safely cast, you can put your energies to other uses to help support a safe, fair election for all.

Be a Poll Watcher for the Biden-Harris PA Dems Team

The following is an email message issued by a director of Voter Protection for the Pennsylvania Democratic Party which I’d like to pass along. Want to be a poll watcher on Election Day in Philadelphia?

Poll Observers will be the campaign’s eyes and ears on the ground throughout Philadelphia on Election Day. Responsible for monitoring a specific polling location and reporting any issues to the campaign’s “Boiler Room,” Poll Observers assist voters and help ensure that every eligible voter can cast a ballot. Poll Observers are the first line of defense against any problems that arise (e.g., long lines, ballot shortages) and any voter intimidation or confusion. Throughout Election Day, Poll Observers will be in close communication with the campaign team, who will provide direction and guidance and help troubleshoot issues.

As a Philadelphia voter, you are uniquely positioned to make a big difference by serving as an Inside Poll Observer (also known as a “Poll Watcher”), in which role you will be permitted inside the polling location you are assigned. Importantly, this will allow you to observe, report, and address what is happening beyond the walls of a particular polling place, where you will raise voter protection issues with Election Officials directly and work with officials and voters to resolve problems in real time. Note that only Philadelphia voters working on behalf of a party or candidate are eligible to play the critical role of an Inside Poll Observer on Election Day. You will receive a formal Poll Watcher Certificate that authorizes you to serve in this role.

Here’s what you need to know and how to sign up:

Time Commitment & Assignment: Ideally, you will be available from 6:30AM until 8:00PM or later on November 3. After completing the requisite training (see below), you’ll receive our Poll Observer Manual and additional information about your role.

Training: To become a Poll Observer you first need to attend an upcoming virtual training session, where you will learn the ins and outs of serving as a Poll Observer from the campaign’s Voter Protection Team – including an overview of the voting process and voters’ rights, what issues to be on the lookout for, how to handle various problems that may arise, and how you will report to and communicate with the campaign.

Sign Up Now! Training sessions are scheduled for Oct. 19, 21, and 22. Click here to sign up for a Poll Observer Training!

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out directly to Magdey Abdallah, Regional Voter Protection Director for the campaign.

Philadelphia Satellite Election Offices

Philadelphia City Commissioners today announced a series of Satellite Election Offices to open on September 29th with other sites to be added “on a rolling basis, as properly trained staff becomes available”, according to a notice posted on the City Commissioners website.

All the offices would be open 7 days a week, starting September 29th, remaining open through Election Day. The hours of operation are as follows: 11:30am to 6:30pm, Monday through Thursday and 9:30am to 4:30pm Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

At these Satellite Election Offices a citizen would be able to: register to vote, request a ballot, complete a ballot, return their mail-in voted ballot – all during one visit.

Region/Location/Address/Zip

1 Center City City Hall Room 140 1400 John F Kennedy Blvd 19107
2 Far Northeast George Washington High School 10175 Bustleton Ave 19116
3 North The Liacouras Center 1776 N Broad St 19121
4 Northwest Roxborough High School 6498 Ridge Ave 19128
5 Southwest Tilden Middle School 6601 Elmwood Ave 19142
6 Upper North Julia De Burgos Elementary 401 W Lehigh Ave 19133
7 West Overbrook Elementary School 2032 N 62Nd St 19151

BillyPenn published a news story a few days ago with a great map of proposed locations.

The locations listed above are published on a page of the Office of the Philadelphia City Commissioners.